Category: 1961

365filmsbyauroranocte: “They need affection an…

365filmsbyauroranocte:

They need affection and love, and someone to whom they can belong and who will belong to them.

The Innocents (Jack Clayton, 1961)

sparklejamesysparkle:“My three dark minks, my …

sparklejamesysparkle:

“My three dark minks, my white mink, my sables, some really very nice little jewels are gone. But the jewels and furs are replaceable, darlings. I lost my little dog in the fire. For that, I am heartbroken.”

Zsa Zsa Gabor (accompanied by friend Robert Straile and an unidentified gentleman) rummages through the remains of her Bel Air estate following the Bel Air fire of November, 1961. Started as a brush fire on November 6th, 1961, the strong Santa Ana winds quickly fanned the blaze into a conflagration, prompting mass evacuations and causing the eventual loss of 484 homes over three days. Zsa Zsa was in New York when her home caught fire and was among many classic film stars who suffered losses during the event. From the Los Angeles Times archives:

-Film stars stood their ground against the encroaching flames, alongside
other residents. Maureen O’Hara and Kim Novak risked their lives to
douse flames with garden hoses. Fred MacMurray took studio workers with
him from the set of “My Three Sons” to help evacuate neighbors and his
family from their two-story colonial house in Brentwood. Then MacMurray
stayed to help firefighters cut down brush around his Halvern Drive
home, confining the fire damage to a portion of his house.

-Burt Lancaster lost his home on Linda Flora Drive, but not his $250,000
art collection, which happened to be on loan to the Los Angeles County
Museum of Art.

-The lush Bel-Air canyons were covered in ash, the hills burned bare. Two
chimneys from Zsa Zsa Gabor’s Bellagio Place home stood like eerie
sentinels over the house’s charred remains. Gabor flew home from New York, where — with a shovel in hand, a 10-carat diamond on one
finger and pearls around her neck — she sifted through the rubble.

-The flames leapfrogged through the verdant canyons of Brentwood and over
Chalon Road to Mandeville Canyon, where actor Robert Taylor escaped
with his dog, Henry, from his 113-acre ranch. Ranch hands took his 11
horses and two hunting dogs to makeshift corrals on the football field
at Paul Revere Middle School.

-Actor
Richard Boone didn’t believe in miracles and spent the night manning
garden hoses at his ranch and at those of two neighbors.Boone had lost his Pacific Palisades home to a fire two years before. But this one was spared.

-Actress Joan Fontaine and comedian Joe E. Brown also lost their homes in the blaze.

LIFE magazine dubbed the fire “A Tragedy Trimmed In Mink” and it became
the fifth-costliest blaze in U.S. history up to that point. Miraculously, no human lives were lost during the fire and it resulted in new laws regarding cedar shingled roofs and brush clearance near populated areas. Vintage news footage from KTLA of the
Bel Air Fire of ‘61

can be viewed on YouTube here, and two interesting documentaries produced about the blaze can be viewed on YouTube here and here.

emmanuelleriva: Anouk Aimée in Lola (1961), di…

emmanuelleriva:

Anouk Aimée in Lola (1961), dir. Jacques Demy

Photo

Photo

barbiescanner: Lowenstein 1961 Marola Witt and…

barbiescanner:

Lowenstein 1961

Marola Witt and Pamela Tiffin

1961

1961

1961

1961

mybelair62:

mybelair62:

1961

absolute-most:

absolute-most:

Marlo Thomas (c. 1961)

cinematify: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

cinematify:

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)